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. in 2005, our son ben had significant surgery over the summer. later in the term, he had more. he called me every day on cell phone to see how ben was doing. and that is the relationship. we are parents first. he understood what my family was going through. you can always build on that. you can always find common ground. he ended up voting on environmental legislation with mefter he told me that he was not a tree hugger and he would not do it. it does work and it is important. you have to focus on what you have in common with the people of new hampshire have in common >> growing up in everett -- have in common. >> and growing up in a republican family and you are of a different party, you realize they're wonderful people on the other side of the spectrum. we worked closely with the republicans, especially the women senators for the yard. kelly had the great race to call me after i w. we talk about the yard and our commitment to the military and to veterans. we share a lot. we need to remember that. >> back to the table of seven kids -- >> i feel i was born bipartisan. my mother was republic
and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of around 2% -- the conventional wisdom was that should -- that this president should not be reelected. as you take a look at what happened two weeks ago, how do you assess this? >> let me just say first that i made a very good living and politics betting against conventional wisdom. it is a general principle of mine that the conventional wisdom is almost always wrong and it was wrong here. it was wrong here because what we often do in political circles and journalism is that we look at what happened in the last election or past elections and we think it is prescriptive for what it will happen -- for what will happen in the f
about different ways to do that, maybe hard of hearing humor. >> take ben stiller, he gets attention for his foundation stiller strong by producing hilarious videos. >> matt damon he claimed water. how did he claim water, aquaman? >> consider this, damon talks about water on youtube, 4,000 hits. this video with sarah silverman. ♪ knock, knock ♪ who's that knocking at my door ♪ >> reporter: viral. damon says his strong suit is getting people to care. >> because there's a lot of low-hanging fruit so to speak. th
about different ways to do that maybe involving humor. >> take ben stiller. he gets attention for his foundation, stiller strong, using humor. >> matt damon claimed water. how do you claim water? >> on youtube, 4,000 hits. this video with sarah silverman? >> knock knock. >> who is that knocking at my door? >> viral. damon siz his strong suit is getting people to care. >> because there's a lot of low-hanging fruit so to speak. there are so many people we can help. >> do you see a solution in your lifetime? >> yes, we do in fact, that's why we're here. >> really, really enjoyed talking to him. he says the whole concept of water credit has actually helped a million people so far around the world have affordable access to clean water. a good first step. 880 million more people to go. he believes this concept is really working. helping people get affordable loans to put a toilet in their home, a faucet in their home. again, he says a big challenge is getting people in the western world to wrap their minds around it. something we can't fathom or understand. he is taking this on as his cause
cuts. the concern we have and that is prompted by ben bernanke or the congressional budget office or lot of outsiders, looking at the way the fiscal cliff is structured, where finds that it actually has too much debt as a production, and i say that as someone who generally does not worry about too much depth as a production, because politicians are so unlikely to reduce the deficit much, but if we went over the cliff, there would be in too what steps the production. takes a wax and domestic discretionary spending -- it takes a big whack at domestic discretionary spending. so we should replace the fiscal cliff with more thoughtful deficit-reduction. make sure that you reduce the deficit in a way that is phased in gradually so we don't seem too much this year. we are all aware the economy's not going as well as it should be. if there's a way to do this more gradually, it would be better for the economy, but you need to lock in the changes so we know we are serious and stick with them, and that it is done more thoughtfully. so that it is an across-the- board hit at many but not all p
caught you talking with senator ben nelson of nebraska. here's what he said. >> if we don't have a deal within the next 24 hours, the question is where do you buy a parachute? looks like we'll be going over the cliff. because the closer we get to the end, the less likely it is you're going to be able to compress an agreement into place that will have enough votes to pass. >> compress is probably a nicer word, ram it through is probably what is going to have to happen in order to -- listen, he just said 24 hours, lisa, to reach an agreement. let's say that happens. maybe some kind of deal at the white house today. what would the mechanics of rushing the deal through congress and getting it passed into law in the next few days, give me those mechanics. >> okay. let's break it down so people are really clear on how this could possibly happen. there are some hurdles that congress would have to get passed, some they set up themselves. the first, the house has a 72-hour rule, they have to have bills printed, 72 hours before they vote on them. but the house has gotten around that before. they
whatever the fiscal cliff, a term coined by ben bernanke. john is on the phone from connecticut. caller: i think it is good, but i think we should have gotten a deeper -- i would have liked to have seen 250. i also find its disturbing it sound like we are being referred to as the people instead of fellow americans -- i find it disturbing it sounds like we are being referred to as the people instead of fellow americans. it sounds like congress is a noterent body, n.yand they are representing us, and i hope they will turn it around and start representing the people's will. >> you heard the back-and-forth. we expected the house to double out 30 minutes ago, but the last minute speeches by democratic and republican members dealing with the issue of hurricane sandy and the $60 billion package that as part of the relief effort -- the house is back tomorrow. the future of the legislation remains uncertain. jack joins us from idaho. i would say good evening, because it is morning in washington but evening in idaho. >> witnessing this spectacle, it strikes me the total rancor -- when boehner is try
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7